Online ACLS, BLS, and PALS Certification for Oklahoma City Medical Professionals

The 2012 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index assigned Oklahoma City an overall well being rating of 67.4—falling exactly on the average score for large metro areas included in the study. The 2012 estimated population from the U.S. Census Bureau was nearly 600,000.

Gallup considered six sub-categories when calculating the overall well-being scores for 190 metropolitan areas. The index highlighted emotional health, physical health, work environment, healthy behavior, life evaluation, and basic access.

Although the diabetes rate among Oklahoma City residents remained stagnant in 2011 and 2012 at 11 percent, it did decrease from the rate of 13.1 percent in 2010. Oklahoma City inhabitants’ frequency of obesity was nearly 3 percent higher than the average for large metro areas with a rate of 27 percent.

Between 2010 and 2012, the prevalence of uninsured residents decreased from 22.2 percent to 19.1 percent. However, Oklahoma City still had a higher prevalence of uninsured individuals than the average large metro area rate of 15.5 percent. Optimism among Oklahoma City residents increased from 67.2 percent to 72.2 percent between 2010 and 2012 in regards to belief that the city is becoming a better place to live.

The frequency at which residents consumed the recommended five daily servings of fruits and vegetables at least four or more days a week increased from 53.6 percent to 55.4 percent between 2010 and 2012. During this same period of time, the occurrence of exercising at least three days a week for 30-minute intervals also increased from 49.5 percent to 50.5 percent.

Oklahoma City’s inhabitants can acquire essential training to provide children with emergency medical care by enrolling in Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). The tests—available on this website—impart future providers with a solid foundation in pediatric emergency care. PALS increases an individual’s preparedness to administer life-saving care to children during traumatic situations like on location of a boating accident.

During the coursework, PALS trainees determine how to rapidly appraise a pediatric patient’s condition with precision before the move to action. PALS training demonstrates the importance of working smoothly alongside colleagues during a resuscitation. The course relies on the American Heart Association (AHA) handbook’s 2010 edition for much of its course material.

A crucial step before one can advance to the PAL test is to understand Basic Life Support (BLS). The BLS test provided on this website acts as a platform on which to build other emergency training. As cardiac care advances, AHA amends guidelines for BLS. For this reason, providers should take a BLS refresher course to remain updated of current practices. One and two person team resuscitations are both explained in the BLS “Chain of Survival.” Cardiac arrest causes the greatest number of fatalities worldwide, so this training is vital for community members of Oklahoma City to acquire.

Using BLS practices, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) teaches urgent care skills to implement during cardiac and neurological emergencies.

ACLS, BLS and PALS certifications provide trainings that are crucial to survive life-threatening situations, so Oklahoma City needs additional certified ACLS providers!

Still have questions? We have answers!

Our team of medical professionals will guide you through the entire process,
making your training and certification process a breeze.

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Select your courses below:

BLS

Fast | Accredited | Online

$65

$95

ACLS

Fast | Accredited | Online

$175

$275

PALS

Fast | Accredited | Online

$175

$275